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Thread: George Floyd

  1. #101
    Quote Originally Posted by jman View Post
    Derek Chauvin had 18 complaints against prior to his murder of George Floyd. How does one keep your job after 18 complaints??

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/05/28/us/mi...oyd/index.html



    And another officer that was present during the murder also had this against him:



    "Thao was also part of a 2017 excessive force lawsuit that was settled by the city of Minneapolis, according to a settlement obtained by CNN and an attorney for the plaintiff in the case.
    The lawsuit was brought by Lamar Ferguson, who claimed in the suit that Thao and another officer subjected him to "cruel and unusual" punishment when they arrested him in October 2014.
    According to the lawsuit, the officers used "unreasonable force," including "punches, kicks and knees to the face and body while Ferguson was defenseless and handcuffed." As a result, Ferguson suffered broken teeth, bruising and trauma, the lawsuit says.
    The city would go on to pay Ferguson and his attorney $25,000 to settle the lawsuit on December 11, 2017.
    Both the city and the officers denied liability in the settlement, according to a 2017 statement from the city of Minneapolis.
    According to the lawsuit, Ferguson was walking home from his grandmother's house with his pregnant girlfriend on October 7, 2014, when they were approached by a Minneapolis police car with Thao and another office inside.
    The lawsuit claims the officers handcuffed Ferguson despite having no probable cause to believe he had committed a crime.
    The officers took Ferguson's wallet and ID and the second officer ran the ID through the National Crime Information Center, a federal database, but no warrant showed up in the system, the lawsuit said.
    Despite this, the second officer "falsely stated that there was a warrant out for Plaintiff's arrest," the lawsuit states. The officer questioned Ferguson about a previous incident involving people who the officer believed were Ferguson's family members, but Ferguson "said he had no information to tell the officers."
    A physical altercation broke out, according to the lawsuit, then Thao threw Ferguson to the ground and began hitting him. Thao allegedly lifted Ferguson's head up by grabbing the back of Ferguson's hoodie as the other officer allegedly kicked him in the mouth.
    Ferguson was taken to a hospital, but allegedly the officers "expressed impatience with medical staff caring" for Ferguson. When he was discharged, the officers allegedly threw his discharge papers -- including prescription painkillers -- in the garbage as they left the hospital, the lawsuit states."
    Wow. It sure seems like this guy had problems. If all this is true, and I don't have any reason to believe it's not, shame on him. Shame on the other officers that were with him, and took part in these actions. Shame on the city of Minneapolis for overlooking things and not firing him long ago. That's what the term "systemic racism" means. The laws don't specifically state anything racist, but the way things are executed sure seem that way sometimes.

    As much as I hate the things that are going on with the riots and stuff, and I certainly don't condone that type of behavior, I understand why people are mad about this kind of stuff.

    I believe that most police officers are good. Most want to help out and protect their neighborhoods and the people in them. They're generally good people. That said, there are a lot of them that are drawn to the profession because they are attracted to the power that comes with it. They are looking for a reason to assert authority over other people. These types need to be watched, and not given any slack on crap like what's described here. Fire them after the first complaint.

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  4. #102
    Moderator jman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by devo_stevo View Post
    Wow. It sure seems like this guy had problems. If all this is true, and I don't have any reason to believe it's not, shame on him. Shame on the other officers that were with him, and took part in these actions. Shame on the city of Minneapolis for overlooking things and not firing him long ago. That's what the term "systemic racism" means. The laws don't specifically state anything racist, but the way things are executed sure seem that way sometimes.

    As much as I hate the things that are going on with the riots and stuff, and I certainly don't condone that type of behavior, I understand why people are mad about this kind of stuff.

    I believe that most police officers are good. Most want to help out and protect their neighborhoods and the people in them. They're generally good people. That said, there are a lot of them that are drawn to the profession because they are attracted to the power that comes with it. They are looking for a reason to assert authority over other people. These types need to be watched, and not given any slack on crap like what's described here. Fire them after the first complaint.
    Completely agree.

    I posted a link above with Conan interviewing Van, who is a black attorney and provides some good context to the arrest, the mentality of black culture regarding officers, etc. Its 30min long but it made me rethink a few my preconceived ideas regarding the events and how I need to be more understanding and less quick to cast blame to anyone.


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  6. #103
    Many of the things that Barack Obama said and did while in office, and since, I didn't care for much. This on the other hand, is actually pretty dang good. It's long, but worth reading.

    https://www.facebook.com/barackobama...749?__tn__=K-R

    As millions of people across the country take to the streets and raise their voices in response to the killing of George Floyd and the ongoing problem of unequal justice, many people have reached out asking how we can sustain momentum to bring about real change.
    Ultimately, itís going to be up to a new generation of activists to shape strategies that best fit the times. But I believe there are some basic lessons to draw from past efforts that are worth remembering.
    First, the waves of protests across the country represent a genuine and legitimate frustration over a decades-long failure to reform police practices and the broader criminal justice system in the United States. The overwhelming majority of participants have been peaceful, courageous, responsible, and inspiring. They deserve our respect and support, not condemnation Ė something that police in cities like Camden and Flint have commendably understood.
    On the other hand, the small minority of folks whoíve resorted to violence in various forms, whether out of genuine anger or mere opportunism, are putting innocent people at risk, compounding the destruction of neighborhoods that are often already short on services and investment and detracting from the larger cause. I saw an elderly black woman being interviewed today in tears because the only grocery store in her neighborhood had been trashed. If history is any guide, that store may take years to come back. So letís not excuse violence, or rationalize it, or participate in it. If we want our criminal justice system, and American society at large, to operate on a higher ethical code, then we have to model that code ourselves.
    Second, Iíve heard some suggest that the recurrent problem of racial bias in our criminal justice system proves that only protests and direct action can bring about change, and that voting and participation in electoral politics is a waste of time. I couldnít disagree more. The point of protest is to raise public awareness, to put a spotlight on injustice, and to make the powers that be uncomfortable; in fact, throughout American history, itís often only been in response to protests and civil disobedience that the political system has even paid attention to marginalized communities. But eventually, aspirations have to be translated into specific laws and institutional practices Ė and in a democracy, that only happens when we elect government officials who are responsive to our demands.
    Moreover, itís important for us to understand which levels of government have the biggest impact on our criminal justice system and police practices. When we think about politics, a lot of us focus only on the presidency and the federal government. And yes, we should be fighting to make sure that we have a president, a Congress, a U.S. Justice Department, and a federal judiciary that actually recognize the ongoing, corrosive role that racism plays in our society and want to do something about it. But the elected officials who matter most in reforming police departments and the criminal justice system work at the state and local levels.
    Itís mayors and county executives that appoint most police chiefs and negotiate collective bargaining agreements with police unions. Itís district attorneys and stateís attorneys that decide whether or not to investigate and ultimately charge those involved in police misconduct. Those are all elected positions. In some places, police review boards with the power to monitor police conduct are elected as well. Unfortunately, voter turnout in these local races is usually pitifully low, especially among young people Ė which makes no sense given the direct impact these offices have on social justice issues, not to mention the fact that who wins and who loses those seats is often determined by just a few thousand, or even a few hundred, votes.
    So the bottom line is this: if we want to bring about real change, then the choice isnít between protest and politics. We have to do both. We have to mobilize to raise awareness, and we have to organize and cast our ballots to make sure that we elect candidates who will act on reform.
    Finally, the more specific we can make demands for criminal justice and police reform, the harder it will be for elected officials to just offer lip service to the cause and then fall back into business as usual once protests have gone away. The content of that reform agenda will be different for various communities. A big city may need one set of reforms; a rural community may need another. Some agencies will require wholesale rehabilitation; others should make minor improvements. Every law enforcement agency should have clear policies, including an independent body that conducts investigations of alleged misconduct. Tailoring reforms for each community will require local activists and organizations to do their research and educate fellow citizens in their community on what strategies work best.
    But as a starting point, Iíve included two links below. One leads to a report and toolkit developed by the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and based on the work of the Task Force on 21st Century Policing that I formed when I was in the White House. And if youíre interested in taking concrete action, weíve also created a dedicated site at the Obama Foundation to aggregate and direct you to useful resources and organizations whoíve been fighting the good fight at the local and national levels for years.
    I recognize that these past few months have been hard and dispiriting Ė that the fear, sorrow, uncertainty, and hardship of a pandemic have been compounded by tragic reminders that prejudice and inequality still shape so much of American life. But watching the heightened activism of young people in recent weeks, of every race and every station, makes me hopeful. If, going forward, we can channel our justifiable anger into peaceful, sustained, and effective action, then this moment can be a real turning point in our nationís long journey to live up to our highest ideals.
    Letís get to work.

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  8. #104
    Basin Cruiser BasinCruiser's Avatar
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    Wow. People have reached peak stupid. A bunch of caucasians kneeling before a bunch of blacks, praying for forgiveness for being white. Unbelievable.


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    https://www.facebook.com/56902285325...4025/?vh=e&d=n
    "Where there is no law, there is no opportunity, where there is no justice, there is no liberty, where there is no safety, there is no future."

  9. #105

  10. #106
    Honest question... Do you think most African Americans understand how lucky they are to have been born in America instead of some third world shithole?!?

    Yeah, I get it... their ancestors paid a high price, but the rewards are now there for the taking for anyone willing to work hard.




    Climb-Utah.com

  11. #107
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceaxe View Post
    Honest question... Do you think most African Americans understand how lucky they are to have been born in America instead of some third world shithole?!?

    Climb-Utah.com
    I think that many do. Not sure if it's most of them though. I don't think that a majority of white kids think that's true anymore either, though.

    One thing that I noticed as I watched things unfold in Salt Lake on Saturday, It was mainly stupid white kids that were causing the damage. When the reporters pulled someone aside to ask some questions, all of the black people they talked to were respectful and said that they were pleading with them to stop screwing around and causing problems. All of the white people they talked to immediately started cussing and blaming and were just cut off right away. For that, I have hope that the black community understands that violence is not the way forward. At least that was my view of things on Saturday in Salt Lake. It's obviously different in other places based on demographics and all that.

    That said, I agree that this is still a country of opportunity. The upward mobility offered to everyone here is wonderful if you want it. That doesn't mean that we can't, and shouldn't, do better.

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  13. #108
    Basin Cruiser BasinCruiser's Avatar
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    You all have been warned: if you're a Trump follower, you're responsible for George's death.

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    https://sites.google.com/view/michigan-deme/home


    Has anyone ever heard a Dem/lib give an actual, logical, coherent example or explanation of what Trump does that meets their criteria of him being racist, or anyone else? They seem to always just throw out that derogatory term with no explanation, and expect people to cower in fear of that label being tied to that them with the hope it manipulates them to change ....something.

    Explain to me how a terrible cop, with a history of abuse and excessive force complaints, in a Democrat city, in a Democrat state, that kills a suspect he has in cuffs prone down on the ground is Trump's fault. ????
    "Where there is no law, there is no opportunity, where there is no justice, there is no liberty, where there is no safety, there is no future."

  14. #109
    Basin Cruiser BasinCruiser's Avatar
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    Awesome. !!!! A sheriff with BALLS, unlike the hapless ditzy mayor of SLC.

    https://youtu.be/kQF2SFz0A0I
    "Where there is no law, there is no opportunity, where there is no justice, there is no liberty, where there is no safety, there is no future."

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  16. #110
    Quote Originally Posted by BasinCruiser View Post
    Attachment 94819

    So, how is it that with all of the video surveillance the government has all over cities, if these reports of palettes of bricks just randomly showing up around cities is real, why is there no footage of people unloading these palettes anywhere? Why would that be?

    Attachment 94822


    Attachment 94823
    This is not new, this has happened in most of the previous racial riots. We just have better pictures now.

    How long until people wake up and see the whole damned thing was planned? Yes he died, but the radical Left used him, chose this opportunity to use their plan.

    Remember a couple of weeks ago they tried to start it up over this guy that was shot, but after a couple of months? The "Black Jogger killed by 2 white men"? It failed. Plan B. Actually, like Plan C because COVID is failing.

    Remember him? Their plan FAILED. On to George Floyd. Do we get it yet????


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  18. #111
    So, now if you can believe in the possibility of "False Flags", meaning a big public spectacle or news narrative to take the attention off of a HUGE current event they don't want you to know about... what is happening right now? What are they trying to distract us from?

    Any guesses? I happen to know a few big things happening, or coming out about the former administration.

    LOOK OVER HERE!!!!

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  20. #112
    Quote Originally Posted by BasinCruiser View Post
    Is this the new normal they keep talking about?

    Attachment 94821
    I hope she wiped.

    Gross.
    #NotMyVirus

  21. #113
    Quote Originally Posted by devo_stevo View Post
    X2
    #NotMyVirus

  22. #114
    Only days apart



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  24. #115
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceaxe View Post
    ...


    Climb-Utah.com
    I did a double check on this last night...I don't know what the law is in Utah, but it appears that in most states, if you shoot someone that is on or even approaching your property in a threatening manner, you'll be charged with murder.

    You literally have to wait until they're INSIDE the house before you can pop off some rounds...and even then you have to "prove" that they intended harm.

    Isn't that something? You can't defend yourself until they've actually breached the gate. Killers, molesters, rapists, looters...they all sure get a lot of leeway, now don't they?
    Roadblocks, man.
    Just don't throw down any roadblocks and it's all good.

  25. #116
    ^^^Utah is a stand your ground state.

    Utah law recognizes your right to self defense. Utah law allows you to use force, including deadly force, if you are approached in a threatening manner. Utah law does not require that you retreat and recognizes your right to stand your ground.

    Utah also allows what is commonly referred to a castle doctrine, which basically states a man is king of his home (castle) and is allowed to use deadly force to stop anyone from unlawfully entering.

    Utah has its shit together when it comes to this crap.

  26. #117
    What I'm about to write might start a shitstorm...but you guys might wanna think twice about legalizing the weed, or you'll end up with more of these loser freaks.

    Saw it with my own eyes here in Colorado...the population of ate up loser multiplied by a factor of 10 after we did it. Homeless people living in the bushes miles from downtown. State is damn near full blue now. Once they come in, you can't get 'em out.

    Taking the feet out from under the Mormon Church is probably not a good idea, either.
    Roadblocks, man.
    Just don't throw down any roadblocks and it's all good.

  27. #118
    Basin Cruiser BasinCruiser's Avatar
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    "Where there is no law, there is no opportunity, where there is no justice, there is no liberty, where there is no safety, there is no future."

  28. #119
    Jeez, look at all that legaleeze...

    Ah, the good 'ole days when you could just walk up and spear 'em in the gut.
    Roadblocks, man.
    Just don't throw down any roadblocks and it's all good.

  29. #120
    Quote Originally Posted by Byron View Post
    Jeez, look at all that legaleeze...

    Ah, the good 'ole days when you could just walk up and spear 'em in the gut.
    If you're going to carry a firearm (or spear) it's wise to know and understand the law and all it's details.



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