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Thread: Hurricane and Earthquake History related to Climate Change

  1. #21
    Hurricane's and earthquakes are natural disasters, which you can't change. If you really want to make a difference in the world concern yourself with what is happening in places like Venezuela. At one time the richest country in South America with huge oil reserves, and yet the people are litteraly starving in the streets today.

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  3. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceaxe View Post
    Hurricane's and earthquakes are natural disasters, which you can't change. If you really want to make a difference in the world concern yourself with what is happening in places like Venezuela. At one time the richest country in South America with huge oil reserves, and yet the people are litteraly starving in the streets today.
    Same could be said of Brazil, who has vast reserves of natural resources - oil, gas, precious metals, Brazil nuts, Fluorite, UFC fighters, etc.

    Coincidentally, Chile is a different story -- they have enormous reserves of base and precious metals (The Chuquicamata copper mine claims they're the world's largest open pit mine, even surpassing Utah's own Bingham Canyon copper mine). But the difference here is that Chile is one of the most advanced and modernized countries in South America.

  4. #23
    That's the sad part, Venezuela WAS one of the most advanced and modernized countries.

    FYI - I designed many of the conveyors and crushers at Chuwuicamata :-) and I designed all the KUC conveyors and the A-Frame you can see from the valley floor.

  5. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceaxe View Post
    That's the sad part, Venezuela WAS one of the most advanced and modernized countries.

    FYI - I designed many of the conveyors and crushers at Chuwuicamata :-) and I designed all the KUC conveyors and the A-Frame you can see from the valley floor.

    My guess is corruption. The level of corruption surrounding high elected government officials and labor union representatives in Latin America is astounding. Those who are at the top are filthy rich oligarchs. I could tell you a few stories of the corruption I saw in Ecuador during my two year stint there...unbelievable.

  6. #25
    That's the sad part, Venezuela WAS one of the most advanced and modernized countries.
    Yes and no. During the energy crisis of the 1970's, on paper Venezuela became very rich. The problem was that only a very small percentage of the people owned almost everything. Cities such as Maricaibo, Caracas, Ciudad Guyana, and Ciudad Bolivar did get modernized, but the rest of the country did not.

    We went there in 1996 because at the time Venezuela was the most stabilized country of the region. No more. Even in the 1990's, you would be hard pressed to find even such basics as clean water, plumbing, or electricity in many of the areas outside the cities mentioned above. There was no middle class and the very small elite class owned almost everything. To add to the woes, Venezuela amassed (both Government and non-government) huge amounts of debt during the oil crisis because it was thought that high oil prices would continue, but when oil prices crashed, profits went down while the debt was still there.

    Since the general population was disenfranchised by the fact that a very small percentage held almost all the wealth in the country, this led to the revolution and the rise of Chavez. Obviously, this backfired as Chavez did no favors to the country and things have gotten worse, especially when it comes to violence.
    Utah is a very special and unique place. There is no where else like it on earth. Please take care of it and keep the remaining wild areas in pristine condition. The world will be a better place if you do.

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  8. #27
    Bogley BigShot oldno7's Avatar
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  9. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by accadacca View Post
    You guys are no fun at all... Some CRAZY things have been happening over the past 30 days or so. I don't see this as being normal...
    Headed back to school for AC and Wall maintenance career.

  10. #29
    Bogley BigShot oldno7's Avatar
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  11. #30
    10 internet points to somebody who can shop an Angry Birds pig on that building

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  13. #31

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  15. #32
    I keep telling you guys that things are changing...

    -------

    Yellowstone supervolcano may blow sooner than thought — and could wipe out life on the planet

    Scientists working in and around Yellowstone National Park say that the supervolcano sitting under the tourist attraction may blow sooner than thought, an eruption that could wipe out life on the planet.

    According to National Geographic, the researchers, from Arizona State University, analyzed minerals in fossilized ash from the most recent mega-eruption and found changes in temperature and composition that had only taken a few decades. Until now, the magazine reported, geologists had thought it would take centuries for the supervolcano to make the transition.

    The discovery, which was presented at a recent volcanology conference, comes on top of a 2011 study that found that ground above the magma reservoir in Yellowstone had bulged by about 10 inches in seven years.

    "It's an extraordinary uplift, because it covers such a large area and the rates are so high," the University of Utah's Bob Smith, an expert in Yellowstone volcanism, told the magazine at the time.


    Features of the park, such as the Old Faithful geyser and the Grand Prismatic Spring that attract visitors from around the world, are signs of a huge magma reservoir rumbling below.

    About 630,000 years ago, National Geographic reported, a powerful eruption shook the region and created the Yellowstone caldera, a bowl 40 miles wide that forms much of the park.


    Perhaps ominously, according the ZME Science website, the previous eruption occurred in about the same timeframe before that — 1.3 million years ago — meaning that the system might be ready for another explosion.

    The researchers, The New York Times reported, have determined that the supervolcano has the ability to spew more than 1,000 cubic kilometers of rock and ash — 2,500 times more material than erupted from Mount St. Helens in 1980 — an event that could blanket most of the United States in ash and possibly plunge the Earth into a volcanic winter.

    The theory of a much shorter timeline than expected was developed by Hannah Shamloo, a graduate student at Arizona State, and several colleagues who spent weeks at Yellowstone’s Lava Creek Tuff — a fossilized ash deposit from its last supereruption.

    According to The Times, Shamloo later analyzed crystals from the team’s dig that recorded changes in temperature, pressure and water content beneath the volcano — much like a set of tree rings.

    “We expected that there might be processes happening over thousands of years preceding the eruption,” Christy Till, a geologist at Arizona State who is Shamloo’s dissertation adviser, told the paper. Instead, the crystals revealed an increase in temperature and a change in composition that had happened more quickly.

    The pair also presented an earlier version of their study at a 2016 meeting of the American Geophysical Union.

    “It’s shocking how little time is required to take a volcanic system from being quiet and sitting there to the edge of an eruption,” Shamloo told The Times, cautioning that more research is necessary before definite conclusions can be drawn.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2017/10/12/yellowstone-supervolcano-may-blow-sooner-than-thought-could-wipe-out-life-planet/757337001/


  16. #33

  17. #34
    Well, if the mega-eruption occurs, maybe it will cool off all the global warmings and then we'll have to revert back to burning fossil fuels because the ash in the stratosphere is blocking out the sun and all solar energy systems will cease to function.

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  19. #35
    If the dinosaurs taught us anything it's that no matter what we do it doesn't matter because a giant asteroid (or super volcano) will eventually hit the earth and wipe us all out.

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