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Thread: Share your 'Lessons Learned'

  1. #1
    Moderator jman's Avatar
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    Share your 'Lessons Learned'

    I was reading a TR just today over on the CC about Medieval Chamber and am happy to hear that wisconnyjohnny shared a detail about (I'm paraphrasing) how he read a bunch of beta about Morning Glory Bridge and the issue of yelling "rope" since many hiking tourists will not know what expression means. I started a thread a year or so about that every issue and like to think (tooting my own horn) that people have read that, thought about it and are wising up now.

    In other words, we are evolving as the 'sport' continually grows in record numbers and I like to see trends and patterns that can potentially help all of us.

    So it got me thinking as to what are YOUR lessons that you have learned (in one or numerous experiences) that you would like to share. It may be preaching to the choir or maybe the eternal lurker will gain some valuable information by reading some of these thoughts.

    *The point of the thread is to let members post their idea, while keeping it sweet and short. (It could turn into an exhausting list very quickly with pages upon pages of information just from one member alone!)


    After 15 years of canyoneering thus far here are just a few of my lessons learned:

    -I wish a bought a rope bag from day one. That would of saved a bunch of headaches and rope management in many canyons.

    -I wish I knew about the triple clove many years ago. That's my now go-to hitch.

    -Always bring a headlamp/Life Straw in my gear.


    Like to share any of yours?
    ●Canyoneering 'Canyon Conditions' @ www.candition.com
    ●Subscribe to my friend Jeff's Youtube Channel - you can watch our adventures there.
    ●Hiking Treks (my younger brother's website): hiking guides at www.thetrekplanner.com
    "There are two ways to die in the desert - dehydration and drowning." -overhearing a Park Ranger at Capitol Reef N.P.
    "He who walks on the edge, will eventually fall."

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    -Always carry a form of water purification EVEN on dry canyons. After being lost in the desert & finding water a purification system BESIDES tablets would be nice.

    - Don't rely on the group leader for route finding. EVERYONE should be familiar with the route through beta & maps. This goes in with me getting lost in the desert lol.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

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  6. #3
    Don't tie knots in the end of your rappel ropes when canyoneering. This is a popular practice among some rock climbers. Sooner or later a knot will get stuck in a canyon crack and you will be stopped mid rappel by a permanent fireman's belay.

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  8. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by dakotabelliston View Post

    - Don't rely on the group leader for route finding. EVERYONE should be familiar with the route through beta & maps. This goes in with me getting lost in the desert lol.
    But sometimes you find a new canyon this way.

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  10. #5
    Never, ever trust the weather. Especially in late summer.

    If there's even a slight chance of precipitation assume that it WILL rain.

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  12. #6
    ∑ Have everyone bring their own harness and gear. Switching harness at repels takes forever. ( Sorry to the group behind us at the last Pinecreek rappel in 2006)
    ∑ Plan your trips with an alternate contingency weekend scheduled, when possible. Having a backup weekend means you wonít talk yourself into doing a canyon during a flash flood.
    ∑ Do the right canyon based on your groupís skill level, during the right season, with the right weather condition, and with everyone properly geared.

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  14. #7
    Don't jump even if it's less than 1 foot, and especially into water where you don't know what's underneath (a friend broke his tibia with a "tiny" jump)

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  16. #8
    Moderator jman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walden View Post
    ∑ Plan your trips with an alternate contingency weekend scheduled, when possible. Having a backup weekend means you wonít talk yourself into doing a canyon during a flash flood.
    Nice. This is excellent advice.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    ●Canyoneering 'Canyon Conditions' @ www.candition.com
    ●Subscribe to my friend Jeff's Youtube Channel - you can watch our adventures there.
    ●Hiking Treks (my younger brother's website): hiking guides at www.thetrekplanner.com
    "There are two ways to die in the desert - dehydration and drowning." -overhearing a Park Ranger at Capitol Reef N.P.
    "He who walks on the edge, will eventually fall."

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    Euro Utah enthusiast Michael_WB's Avatar
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    Make an earlier start than you think reasonable, yet plan for it to be a later finish than you think likely.

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  20. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by nkanarik View Post
    Don't jump even if it's less than 1 foot, and especially into water where you don't know what's underneath (a friend broke his tibia with a "tiny" jump)
    I would like to hear more thoughts on this. In principle I completely agree with this statement but in practice I wonder how much doesn't it slow you down you have a static landing at every little drop? How many people practice this?

  21. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by PhysWiz View Post
    I would like to hear more thoughts on this. In principle I completely agree with this statement but in practice I wonder how much doesn't it slow you down you have a static landing at every little drop? How many people practice this?
    Wise and experienced canyoneers use finely honed skills, young and over enthusiast canyoneers attempt to cover up their lack of skills by jumping.

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  23. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by PhysWiz View Post
    I would like to hear more thoughts on this. In principle I completely agree with this statement but in practice I wonder how much doesn't it slow you down you have a static landing at every little drop? How many people practice this?
    Slow and steady == good pace (/pick up the pace on flat areas). Use your arms (semi stemming) to go down.

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