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Thread: Flat Tire Repair

  1. #1
    Adventurer at Large! BruteForce's Avatar
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    Flat Tire Repair

    Well, I'm a mountain biking newb..

    I took my mountain bike to Taylors Bike shop to ensure I got the correct replacement inner tube. Replaced the Kenda tube (had at least 12 holes) with a FlatAttack tube, and also picked up schrader valve adapters for the Presta valves fittings. <is there some noticeable difference between valves.. seems to me, the schrader is more universal>

    While at Taylors Bike shop, the guy behind the counter kept saying how much he'd like to have a bike like mine. No idea what the big deal is, but he told me that based on Fox shocks throughout, the disc brake, frame, etc - that I could get $4000 out of it! WOAH!

    Ready to ride again! I feel a 0515am ride through SoJo coming up tomorrow!
    2020 Jeep Gladiator (2" Lift, 37" Tires, Falcon 3.3 Shocks, Lockers, Sliders)
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  3. #2

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Sombeech View Post
    Just don't go tubeless

  5. #4
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    Are we there yet?

  6. #5
    Adventurer at Large! BruteForce's Avatar
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    Clearly I'm missing something in the conversation, although I have started to explore tubeless tires and/or inserts.
    2020 Jeep Gladiator (2" Lift, 37" Tires, Falcon 3.3 Shocks, Lockers, Sliders)
    2018 Polaris Sportsman XP 1000 (Hunter Edition)
    2014 Polaris Sportsman XP 850 HO EFI EPS (Browning Edition)
    2009 Dodge Ram 3500 Mega Laramie/Resistol DRW (~800HP/1400TQ)
    Yukon Charlies 930 Trail Series Snow Shoes
    5.11 Tactical Coyote Boots

    The random world and adventures of BruteForce

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by BruteForce View Post
    Clearly I'm missing something in the conversation, although I have started to explore tubeless tires and/or inserts.
    There's along thread on here about tubeless tires, or should I say debate on them. Here's some advise, stick with tubes and maybe a little slime in the tubes. It'll make your mtn biking much experience much more enjoyable.

    Sent from my SPH-L900

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by RedSpecialized View Post
    There's along thread on here about tubeless tires, or should I say debate on them. Here's some advise, stick with tubes and maybe a little slime in the tubes. It'll make your mtn biking much experience much more enjoyable.

    Sent from my SPH-L900
    That's painting with a pretty broad brush there.

    Here's the thread he was referring to:
    http://www.bogley.com/forum/showthre...going-tubeless

    There are some counterpoints there for your reading pleasure.

  9. #8
    The presta valves tend to retain air in the tires much longer than the standard Schraders. I have both types in my bedroom (yes, I keep my MTB's in my house ), and I notice the Prestas will lose roughly 1-2 psi's every two weeks, whereas the schraders lose about 5. I also heard (not sure if it is fact) that the smaller opening for the presta equates to stronger rims in that area, but I have only seen a rim taco'd, and not split at the valve, so I am thinking that's a fallacy.
    Mountain guy trapped in the wetlands of Florida.

  10. #9
    Oh, and as for the flats. It looks by your profile pic you are in AZ? Cactus and thorns are the bane of a MTBers existence out there. But the right combo of tires and tubes can prevent a lot of flats. I am not a tubeless fan. I run Kenda Nevegals or Specialized (not S Works) tires. Are they heavier? Yes. Is there more rolling resistance? Yes. But I am not racing while I ride. I want to deter punctures. As for tubes, avoid the thinner walled tubes. These are (believe it or not) more expensive. I buy my tubes off Pricepoint.com. I get Pricepoint's generic tubes, which are thick as hell. I have only had one puncture out here in Florida (thanks to a large sand spur) and NONE in AZ. I rode Moab, Sedona, and Red Canyon with zero issues on that setup. Of course, stay on the trail and always carry a spare tube or two. If you get a flat, inspect the heck out of the inside of the tire to make sure you cleared out whatever caused the puncture to begin with. I run my fingers along the entire tire. I learned this after swapping three tubes out in one ride and found a piece of metal sticking through there....that was on a paved ride, or course.
    Mountain guy trapped in the wetlands of Florida.

  11. #10
    "The presta valves tend to retain air in the tires much longer than the standard Schraeders." Hi - Just curious... are all other factors identical? I.E. type of rubber (Butyl vs Latex), age of rubber, thickness of tube, absolutely puncture free, etc??? I've had tubes with tiny pinhole leaks that I could not identify without really pumping them up and squeezing them under water. I've also had Presta valves that were not properly seated in the stem that leaked slowly. There is a little O-ring where they screw in to the stem. That has to be compressed a bit for them to seal. Same with Schraeder valves... they have to be screwed in tight to remain leak-free. Seriously - if all is as it should be, the type of valve should not be an issue. By the way, I'm not advocating one over the other, just questioning the reality of one holding air better than the other.

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by goomba271 View Post
    "The presta valves tend to retain air in the tires much longer than the standard Schraeders." Hi - Just curious... are all other factors identical? I.E. type of rubber (Butyl vs Latex), age of rubber, thickness of tube, absolutely puncture free, etc??? I've had tubes with tiny pinhole leaks that I could not identify without really pumping them up and squeezing them under water. I've also had Presta valves that were not properly seated in the stem that leaked slowly. There is a little O-ring where they screw in to the stem. That has to be compressed a bit for them to seal. Same with Schraeder valves... they have to be screwed in tight to remain leak-free. Seriously - if all is as it should be, the type of valve should not be an issue. By the way, I'm not advocating one over the other, just questioning the reality of one holding air better than the other.
    The "O ring" you are taking about is nothing more than a screw down to keep the stem in place so it doesn't pinch. Prestas also have a small cylinder screw in the valve assembly that helps keep the air in the tube. If you've ever run both tubes, you will notice the air retention of the presta is much better. Has nothing to do with the quality of rubber in the tube. It's the valve. Period. Anyone else on the forum will probably verify it. Had nothing to do with "sealing" when you screw down the presta to the rim. You can run thin race tubes or thick thorn resistant tubes..anything with a presta will maintain pressure longer while the bike is sitting. I'm not talking about active riding, which is what I think you are mistaking my comment to mean. I'm talking about letting your bike sit in the garage for a couple weeks. If you were at 40psi on both valves when you hung your bike, chances are you'd be at 39 after two weeks with the presta and 35 or less with the schrader. Thats what I was speaking of.



    Sent from my iPhone4S using Tapatalk
    Mountain guy trapped in the wetlands of Florida.

  13. #12

    Presta 0-ring photo...

    "The "O ring" you are taking about is nothing more than a screw down to keep the stem in place so it doesn't pinch."

    Hi - Was only trying to rule out possibilities. Here is a photo of one type of Presta valve assembly that has been unscrewed from the stem itself. I've seen other types but this is the one that was slowly leaking where it screws in to the end of the stem. If you look closely at the left side of the valve assembly, there are actually three rubber seals. I'll call them o-rings if you don't mind? One seals the opening where the air goes in and out. The other two seal where this assembly screws in to the stem itself. After I screwed it in a bit tighter, it stopped leaking and has held air ever since. I still check my pressures on any of my tubes - Schraeder or Presta and find it's not unusual to top them up every now and then. I don't get my panties too wadded up over it.

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  14. #13
    Well, you got me there. I never dismantled the valve from the tube itself, so I guess I had no idea there were O rings there. Guess I never had a reason to do that. If you're having this much of an issue with the valve, then switch tube brands. Mountain biking and maintenance is pretty much trial and error. You find what works good for you and you stick with it. You ditch the stuff that sucks, and try different ones until you find one that works. I had crappy thin tubes that went flat all the time, went to thicker ones that had lousy stems, and I finally found one that works.


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    Mountain guy trapped in the wetlands of Florida.

  15. #14

    valves

    Hi - FWIW, I just checked one of my road bikes and the front tube has a removable Presta valve like in the picture. The rear tube does not appear to be removable. On my other bikes it's also a mixed bag. The ones that are removable have that flattened out section on the outer threads that can be gripped with pliers or tiny wrench. I only brought it up because it happened to me recently when my son brought his bike to me with a flat tire... I.E. bubbling from around the valve itself. I agree it can be difficult to find decent quality stuff on a consistent basis. Just about the time I think I've found a brand and model I like, it's either discontinued or they change it up, though my biggest issue is often my own clumsy inability to get a 'tight' tire off and on without pinching the tube...

  16. #15
    Carbon Footprint Donor JP's Avatar
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    Nice clear pic, makes it so much easier.

    Quote Originally Posted by goomba271 View Post
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