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Thread: Stocks

  1. #21
    Stock is going back up.
    Utah is a very special and unique place. There is no where else like it on earth. Please take care of it and keep the remaining wild areas in pristine condition. The world will be a better place if you do.

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  3. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott P View Post
    Stock is going back up.
    That didn't last long. $27.72 and still dropping like a rock.

  4. #23
    Did you get an ear nailing with the stocks?



    Funnily, even with the

  5. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceaxe View Post
    That didn't last long. $27.72 and still dropping like a rock.
    Another big hit today. Where does it bottom out?

  6. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Reedus View Post
    Another big hit today. Where does it bottom out?
    At about $4 a share. I might consider buying some then. I avoided the GM IPO as well. Remember the pet rock?

  7. Likes Scott P liked this post
  8. #26
    Another big hit today. Where does it bottom out?
    At about $4 a share. I might consider buying some then.
    I'm guessing that it may bottom out at ~17-$18. We should take a poll.

    Anyway, check out the hype before going public:

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/...84E1B720120515

    Many internet companies had stocks that initially went down after going public, but then went back up again.

    Personally, I doubt that Facebook is going to go bankrupt anytime soon or that it's stock will become worthless any time soon. I would bet that it won't go the way of Myspace for at least several years.
    Utah is a very special and unique place. There is no where else like it on earth. Please take care of it and keep the remaining wild areas in pristine condition. The world will be a better place if you do.

  9. #27
    Zions the "s" is silent trackrunner's Avatar
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    the cool kids started selling their FB shares when they found out their parents had bought shares.

  10. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by trackrunner View Post
    the cool kids started selling their FB shares when they found out their parents had bought shares.
    ^^^THIS^^^

    The big problem is there is nothing to prevent FB from becoming the next MySpace. They own no patents that will stop the next cool thing from knocking them off.

  11. #29
    Facebook is a great example of how to make a small fortune in the stock market. To do it all you have to do is start with a large fortune and invest in a company that has no tangible assets or real value beyond perceived value....


    Facebook $24.10


  12. #30
    FB down 11.5% to $23/share today 7/27.

    Bye Bye FB...
    hu·bris
    /(h)yo͞obrəs/

    noun

    1. A personality quality of extreme or foolish pride.
    2. Dangerous overconfidence, often combined with arrogance.



  13. #31
    I'm gonna call their bottom at $7.50. Anywhere thereabouts or lower I might consider buying.


    BTW, given how quickly this stock is in freefall, I would recommend buying up a bunch of put options and or selling the stocks short. These two techniques make you money when a certain stock is tanking.
    hu·bris
    /(h)yo͞obrəs/

    noun

    1. A personality quality of extreme or foolish pride.
    2. Dangerous overconfidence, often combined with arrogance.



  14. #32

  15. #33
    I find it hard to believe that Facebook is selling at more than twice the price of Ford. BTW, you should buy some of that RIGHT NOW (Ford, that is...).

  16. #34
    Facebook drops below $20 per share:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...p_ref=business
    Utah is a very special and unique place. There is no where else like it on earth. Please take care of it and keep the remaining wild areas in pristine condition. The world will be a better place if you do.

  17. #35
    Facebook drops below $20 per share:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...p_ref=business

    SAN FRANCISCO, Aug 2 (Reuters) - Shares of Facebook Inc dipped below $20 for the first time on Thursday, pummeled by ongoing doubts about its growth prospects, a string of recent executive departures, and the Aug. 16 expiration of a lockup period on insiders' share sales.
    The stock hit a low of $19.82 in heavy trading on Thursday afternoon. It has now lost almost half its value since debuting at $38 in May in the largest IPO ever to emerge from Silicon Valley.

    "The sentiment on this thing is so negative," said Topeka Capital Markets analyst Victor Anthony. "I think this thing may continue to tick down until you see some sort of meaningful catalyst which unfortunately may not show until third-quarter earnings."

    On Wednesday, Facebook's director of platform partnerships, Ethan Beard, and the director of platform marketing, Katie Mitic, each separately announced plans to leave the company. They represent the latest of several departures -- including that of Facebook's chief technology officer in June -- since the IPO.

    Facebook's first tier of lock-up restrictions go away on Aug. 16, when about 271 million shares will be available for trading, with another 243 million shares set to become available for trading between mid-October and mid-November.

    But the day most investors are bracing for is Nov. 14, when more than 1.2 billion shares will suddenly be available for trading.

    The imminent lock-up expiration also means that Wall Street analysts who participated in the Facebook IPO will once again go quiet, for a 30-day period, potentially creating more uncertainty in a stock that has experienced one of the rockiest market debuts in memory.

    Of the 36 Wall Street analysts covering Facebook, 20 belong to firms that were involved in the IPO.

    The first American company to debut with a market valuation of more than $100 billion, Facebook has fallen out of favor on Wall Street as investors fret about its slowing revenue growth.

    In the second quarter, Facebook reported revenue growth of 32 percent, compared with the more than 100 percent growth it delivered at the same time last year.

    Facebook shares were down 4.6 percent at $19.91 on Thursday afternoon, off the earlier low at $19.82. (Reporting by Alexei Oreskovic; Editing by Maureen Bavdek, Tim Dobbyn and Matthew Lewis)
    Utah is a very special and unique place. There is no where else like it on earth. Please take care of it and keep the remaining wild areas in pristine condition. The world will be a better place if you do.

  18. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott P View Post
    Facebook drops below $20 per share

    Facebook is in their own private recession. I believe their current status would say "it's complicated."
    hu·bris
    /(h)yo͞obrəs/

    noun

    1. A personality quality of extreme or foolish pride.
    2. Dangerous overconfidence, often combined with arrogance.



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  20. #37

    Re: Stocks

    $19.05 and still falling.

  21. #38

    Stocks

    So...does anyone actually own any FaceBook stock?
    Some people "go" through life and other people "grow" through life. -Robert Holden

  22. #39
    What gives?

    --

    Dow surges to record ... and keeps going

    See how to embed KSL Videos in your posts



    NEW YORK (AP) - The Dow Jones industrial average closed at an all-time high Tuesday, beating the previous record it set in October 2007, before the financial crisis and Great Recession.

    The Dow rose 125.95 points to 14,253.77, an increase of 0.89 percent. The index jumped from the opening bell, climbed as much as 158 points early and peaked at 14,286.

    The Dow surpassed its previous record close of 14,164.53 from Oct. 9, 2007.

    Tuesday's record represents a remarkable comeback for the stock market. The Dow has more than doubled since falling to a low of 6,547 in March 9, 2009, following the financial crisis and the onset of the Great Recession. Stocks have been helped by stimulus from the Federal Reserve and quarter after quarter of record corporate profits, even as the economic recovery has been slow and unemployment has remained high.

    "It's the perfect confluence of events," said Jim Russell, an investment director at US Bank. "This will grab everybody's attention, it will be a front page story and it tends to draw people toward the market, not push them away from it."

    The recovery in stocks may even have been quicker had memories of the financial system's near-collapse not been on investors' minds, said Robert Pavlik, chief market strategist at Banyan Partners.

    "It's still pretty close to the front of people's brains," he said. "That's one of the reasons that people are hesitant to invest in the stock market."

    That could be changing. More money has been flowing into stock mutual funds since the beginning of the year.

    Investors who have who stayed out of the market the past four years may be deciding to get off the sidelines, Pavlik said.

    The Dow opened higher Tuesday following a surge in markets around the globe. China's markets rose after the government said it would support ambitious growth targets. European markets jumped following a surprisingly strong rise in retail sales across the 17 countries that use the euro. In the U.S., more hopeful news about housing kept the momentum going.

    Twenty-seven stocks in the 30-member Dow advanced, with industrial companies leading the gains. Coca-Cola and Merck & Co. fell, while aluminum giant Alcoa was flat.

    The Dow's gains Tuesday were led by industrial and technology stocks. Cisco System rose 48 cents, or 2.3 percent, to $21.22 and United Technologies climbed $1.89, or 2.2 percent, to $91.02.

    More stable, conservative stocks like utilities and consumer staples logged smaller gains.

    All 10 industry groups in the broader Standard & Poor's 500 stock index rose, led by technology companies.

    Billionaire Warren Buffet, who has long been bullish on stocks, gave a big endorsement to them on Monday in an interview with CNBC. He said that he still thinks stocks are a good buy, while long-term government bonds are "the dumbest investment."

    Stocks are still a good deal because earnings have risen so much, said Darell Krasnoff, Managing Director at Bel Air investment Advisors.

    Per-share earnings in 2012 were a third higher than they were in 2007 when the broader S&P 500 was this high.

    "People get overly focused on benchmarks," he said. "The fact that it's reached that level is an interesting landmark, but it doesn't say anything about whether the market is over-, or under-valued."

    Stocks are also attractive compared with bonds after a five-year rally in the debt market that pushed yields to record lows.

    The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, at 1.90 percent, is lower than the dividend yield of about 2.1 percent on the S&P 500, which measures the ratio of annual dividend payments to stock prices.

    Despite the rise in the Dow, the U.S. economy has not fared as well. Unemployment was just 4.7 percent when the Dow last reached a record five and half years ago, versus 7.9 percent today.

    But the economy is strengthening in many areas. Housing and auto sales are rising, home prices are recovering, and companies are hiring more. That has helped drive a 9 percent rise in the Dow this year, impressing even skeptics. For all of last year, the index rose 7 percent.

    Stocks are also benefiting from the economic stimulus from the Federal Reserve and other global central banks.

    Under a program called "quantitative easing," the Fed has bought trillions of dollars of bonds, pushing up their prices and sending their yields lower. That makes stocks more attractive to investors than bonds and keeps interest rates low throughout the economy, encouraging investment and spending.

    The U.S. central bank began buying bonds in January 2009 and is still purchasing $85 billion each month in Treasury bonds and mortgage-backed securities.

    The Dow has even managed to climb to a record despite the backdrop of political wrangling in Washington. Automatic government budget cuts took effect Friday after President Barack Obama and Congress failed to reach a budget deal. Economists expect the cuts to hurt U.S. economic growth.

    From its March 2009 low to today, the Dow's gain has been led by: American Express, up almost 500 percent from $10.64 to $64.12. Home Depot has jumped almost 300 percent from $18.23 to $70.47. Caterpillar, the maker of the construction and mining equipment, has gained 277 percent, from $23.92 to $90.21. Entertainment giant Walt Disney has surged 262 percent, from $15.59 to $56.48.

    Stocks with small gains include Exxon Mobil, which has advanced 38 percent from $64.57 to $89.61, Cisco Systems, up 55 percent from $13.62 to $21.22, and Wal-Mart, which has climbed 55 percent from $47.51 to $73.72.

    Hewlett-Packard is the only stock in the index that is lower than it was four years ago, falling 22 percent from $25.53 to $20.37.

    Investors received another piece of positive news on the U.S. economy, a report that U.S. service companies grew in February at the fastest pace in a year, thanks to higher sales and more orders. The gain suggests higher taxes have yet to slow consumer spending on services.

    Home builder PulteGroup rose 50 cents, or 2.5 percent, to $20.22 following news that home prices rose at the fastest pace since before the housing market collapse. That is a sign that the market is gaining momentum as it nears the spring selling season. Home prices rose 9.7 percent in January compared with the same month a year earlier, the fastest rate of growth recorded since April 2006, according to data released by CoreLogic.

    In the five years ending in 2012, investors pulled a net $545 billion from U.S. stock mutual funds, according to data from Investment Company Institute. During the same period, they poured a total of $1 trillion into bond mutual funds.

    In January, ICI estimates that investors put a net $18.6 billion into stock funds.

    On Tuesday, the Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 15 points, or 1 percent, to 1,539.79. The index is 25 points, or 1.6 percent, from its own record close of 1,565. The Nasdaq composite gained 42 points, or 1.3 percent, to 3,224.13. The index is 1,825 points, or 57 percent, short of its record close of 5,048.62 from March 10, 2000.

    Another record was reached, though: The Dow Jones transportation average closed at an all-time high of 6,136.72, up 92 points, or 1.5 percent.

    The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose two basis points to 1.90 percent. Gold rose $2.50, or 0.2 percent, to $1,574.90 an ounce and the price of oil climbed 70 cents, or 0.8 percent, to $90.82 a barrel.


  23. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by accadacca View Post
    The U.S. central bank began buying bonds in January 2009 and is still purchasing $85 billion each month in Treasury bonds and mortgage-backed securities.
    There's your answer. Also, the mortgage crisis didn't wipe out the life savings of millions of people that kept their cool and rode it out...they also have been saving cash for years...waiting for buying opportunities. Some, like me, actually bought MORE stock when it hit bottom.

    This is a little buying frenzy right now...the herd mentality. Personally, I'm a bit leery of this. If the economy was humming along, unemployment below 6% and a government that wasn't so tax happy then I'd certainly be encouraged by the market rising like this...and having the ability to sustain that growth.

    How will this all play out? They can't keep buying up bonds forever, even Bernanke said so today...he said they'll keep it up until the UR gets below 6%...he figures at least a year. We'll see about that.

    I heard today that day trading is very popular these days, and you can really make some money, but the research involved would be a full time job...not something you want to go into flying by the seat of your pants!

    Man, it must suck to be at retirement age RIGHT NOW...these poor people don't know if they're coming or going. For my sake, I hope to God we're not going through this crap 18 years from now.
    Life is what you make it. Everybody knows that...right?

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