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Thread: 127 Hours

  1. #41

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  3. #42
    Content Provider Emeritus ratagonia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceaxe View Post
    Sweet..... shades of one of the best racing movies ever made.... LeMans, with Steve McQueen. The film contain no dialogue what-so-ever for the first 35 minute.... and very little dialogue after that. The film was very popular with racing fans for its great camera work and a relatively accurate depiction of auto racing (in other words, it was NOT Days of Thunder). Canyoneers will be extremely lucky if 127 Hours does half as good of job of representing our sport accurately.
    Except that we've seen the trailer, we know they have dialogue in the setup, unless it is in flashback ? could be! I'd rather see flashbacks to the SUV full of partying cuties!!!

    But I'll take that as a movie recommend, Shane. Cars and racing - you the expert around here.

    Tom

  4. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Sombeech View Post
    The dude is cool, give him a hand
    Couldn't let that one slip by eh?

  5. #44
    Moderator jman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sombeech View Post
    The dude is cool, give him a hand
    Ehhh...you're forcing it. Already been said. Sowwwwry.
    ●Canyoneering 'Canyon Conditions' @ www.candition.com
    ●Hiking Treks (my younger brother's website): hiking guides @ www.thetrekplanner.com
    "He who walks on the edge...will eventually fall."
    "There are two ways to die in the desert - dehydration and drowning." -overhearing a Park Ranger at Capitol Reef N.P.
    "...the first law of gear-dynamics: gear is like a gas - it will expand to fit the available space." -Wortman, Outside magazine.
    "SEND IT, BRO!!"

  6. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by Sombeech View Post
    The dude is cool, give him a hand
    Give him two thumbs up...

  7. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by CarpeyBiggs View Post
    they used many different locations, including the actual location in bluejohn, just seems that much of the trailer is shown in leprechaun, obviously, because it is much easier to get equipment in to.
    Actually, most of this was shot on a stage they built in the old Granite Furniture building in Sugarhouse. They created two different replicas of the slot for the up close and personal stuff they did with Franco. The sets actually looked really convincing once they were lit. Due to all of the snow we had down there last winter they had to dramatically change their schedule as they began shooting in early March. They weren't able to get out on location until late April/early May.

    I got approached by a friend of mine in the film commission who knew I do this crazy stuff and he asked me about other locations they could shoot to avoid the snow. I pointed him in the North Wash direction and it looks like they shot quite a bit there with the exception of the 2nd unit stuff. Someone from Moab ultimately ended up guiding them in there. I think it was one of the guys from Desert Highlights but I can't remember for sure.

    They also shot with a myriad of cameras. In the canyons they used the SI 2K and Canon 5D. 35mm for everything else. Looks like it could be a cool film. The only thing I have a hard time with is the giant pool of clear blue water. I don't remember it being that clean the last time I dropped into it

  8. #47
    Content Provider Emeritus ratagonia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FOX View Post
    Actually, most of this was shot on a stage they built in the old Granite Furniture building in Sugarhouse. They created two different replicas of the slot for the up close and personal stuff they did with Franco. The sets actually looked really convincing once they were lit. Due to all of the snow we had down there last winter they had to dramatically change their schedule as they began shooting in early March. They weren't able to get out on location until late April/early May.

    I got approached by a friend of mine in the film commission who knew I do this crazy stuff and he asked me about other locations they could shoot to avoid the snow. I pointed him in the North Wash direction and it looks like they shot quite a bit there with the exception of the 2nd unit stuff. Someone from Moab ultimately ended up guiding them in there. I think it was one of the guys from Desert Highlights but I can't remember for sure.

    They also shot with a myriad of cameras. In the canyons they used the SI 2K and Canon 5D. 35mm for everything else. Looks like it could be a cool film. The only thing I have a hard time with is the giant pool of clear blue water. I don't remember it being that clean the last time I dropped into it
    Brett Sutteer from Moab Cliffs and Canyons did the rigging - or at least was out there with them. http://www.cliffsandcanyons.com/guides.html

    Yeah, when I did my dive test, it was nowhere near that clear - but a bit of good lighting and...

    Tom

  9. #48
    Thanks Tom! That's right it was Brett. I don't know him personally but now that you mentioned it I do remember hearing his name and that company.

  10. #49
    interesting stuff. why did they do the replica in sugarhouse of all places?

    we rolled by the rolling city in north wash while they were shooting. crazy amounts of trucks and gear and people. they were at leprechauns for at least a few days. must've been the end of april i saw them. i also know they were in the roost for at least a few days, just because people saw them out there with the choppers and what not, but i imagine the replica slot makes things a whole lot easier...

    and they actually used a 5d to shoot some of that? that's wild indeed.

  11. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by CarpeyBiggs View Post
    interesting stuff. why did they do the replica in sugarhouse of all places?

    we rolled by the rolling city in north wash while they were shooting. crazy amounts of trucks and gear and people. they were at leprechauns for at least a few days. must've been the end of april i saw them. i also know they were in the roost for at least a few days, just because people saw them out there with the choppers and what not, but i imagine the replica slot makes things a whole lot easier...

    and they actually used a 5d to shoot some of that? that's wild indeed.
    Boyle and company wanted to set up their main office in SLC and the Granite building is set to be demo'd...so it was a CHEAP space to rent and they could trash it however they wanted.

  12. #51
    I came through Leprechaun as they were filming. They had some stuntmen coming in from the top of Belfast Blvd and sliding down into the slot, I assume they were filming the shot before the pool in the trailer. Dave Black was there doing the rigging at the time.

  13. #52
    you don't see that everyday in leprechaun ...

  14. #53
    I don't think many people have used a ladder at the last rappel in east lep either.

  15. #54
    Danny Boyle's '127 Hours' Labeled "Too Intense" After Medics Called to Screenings
    By Perri Nemiroff

    Back in 2003, Aron Ralston went canyoneering in Blue John Canyon. When a loose boulder wound up tumbling on top of him, crushing his arm, Ralston found himself alone and unable to seek help. After five days, he opted to resort to dramatic measures, cutting off the pinned appendage. Just reading a brief synopsis of Ralston's experience is unsettling enough; imagine seeing the story unfold on screen. Apparently it was too much for some at the Telluride Film Festival because according to indieWIRE, two people required medical attention during screenings of Danny Boyle's film 127 Hours, which is based on Ralston's story.

    On Saturday night, one moviegoer was taken out of a screening on a gurney and just a little later, another viewer suffered a panic attack during a subsequent showing. Here's Fox Searchlight's Michelle Hooper's summary of the events:

    From what I understand, an older gentleman was light-headed at the first screening (Galaxy) and the medics helped him calm down. Second screening at the Palm was a young woman (maybe 19 or 20) who had a panic attack. Paramedics attended to both people. I didn't even know about the second incident until after the screening was over and someone told me (I was sitting in the first half of the theater).

    Without belittling the individuals' circumstances, I'm inclined to believe this is all just one big coincidence. For all we know this older man could have missed a meal prior to his screening and perhaps this young woman is prone to panic attacks. Without knowing the details, it's difficult to blame 127 Hours for the occurrences.

    There are tons of instances where viewers suffer health issues while watching particularly intense events unfold on screen. indieWIRE recalls the reaction to Pulp Fiction when it was screened at the 2004 New York Film Festival and vomiting during The Exorcist. There's also the woman who suffered a heart attack during The Passion of the Christ. I'm sure that list can go on and on, especially now that 3D movies are running rampant and are legitimately making people sick, but I'm also inclined to believe that people must pass away or fall ill during movies all the time; we're just hearing about these because of the nature of the material. Yes, THR may call 127 Hours "excruciating to watch," but there are tons of productions out there that garner the same description.

    We hope both people are feeling better, but don't let their conditions deter you from catching James Franco's performance as Ralston. According to the early reviews, this is one not to miss. Our own Eugene Novikov cites some weak spots, but says it's "extremely effective as a thriller, and moderately so as a minor character study."

    http://blog.moviefone.com/2010/09/06...s-too-intense/

  16. #55
    Epiphany of an everyman.
    by Lisa Kennedy

    People have fainted at the sight of Aron Ralston's famously grisly self-liberation during early screenings of the upcoming biopic "127 Hours."
    The first time Ralston saw his onscreen avatar break free from his entrapment was in July with a test audience in a New Jersey theater. Wearing sunglasses and a hat pulled down, he had been spirited into the multiplex by Oscar-winning director Danny Boyle.
    When the graphic, triumphant scene of Ralston cutting off his own arm arrived, people all around him fell into silence.
    "There I am sitting, eating popcorn and munching loudly," Ralston said. "And I'm like crunch, crunch, crunch. I'm thinking, 'Why am I making so much noise?' "
    It's just one of the questions Ralston hashes over these days as his public persona moves into a different realm of public lore — from that of folk hero to celluloid icon — the sort of transition that can happen only when your story is perpetually retold by a major Hollywood movie.
    It is a few hours before an Aspen Filmfest screening of "127 Hours" and Ralston, 34, sits in the lobby of the mountain town's Jerome Hotel. His left hand covers the gently rounded stump where his right hand once was. But he's a gesturer, and soon both arms take flight as he talks about life lived after a crucible. About the fresh lessons of an old wound. About the trickiness of forging ahead as his 7-year-old tale gets told again and again when he's embarked on a different kind of adventure. Three years ago he got involved with Jessica Trusty. A year ago they married. They live in Boulder with their 8-month-old son, Leo.

    Life-changing lessons:

    But his story is, as they say, unforgettable. In May 2003, he became famous when he saved his life by amputating his lower arm with a dull utility knife. An avid wilderness adventurer, Ralston, then 27, was making his way alone through Blue John Canyon in Utah's Canyonlands National Park when a boulder slipped, pinning his right hand and wrist to a slot-canyon wall. The title of his best-selling 2004 memoir about the six-day ordeal? "Between a Rock and a Hard Place."
    His story exerted a vise grip on the imaginations of millions. Hundreds camped outside the hospital. There were, he recalls, thousands of e-mails and phone calls, some well-wishing, some angling to tell his story. Over time there were appearances on "Late Show With David Letterman," an NBC news documentary and many more stops on the media circuit.
    Ralston's 15 minutes of fame should have run out roughly 56,000 hours ago. But "127 Hours" may reignite some resentment over the media attention. Mention his name around town and, even now, the word "reckless" comes up.
    Ralston famously did not leave a note about his weekend plans. He had been a wilderness guide and former mountain rescuer. He should have known better.
    Ralston understands the sentiment. He's wrestled with what in his makeup led him into the canyon solo.
    "I had a major realization in the canyon. Then you go back to living," he says with a brief laugh. "How do I do this and not be so arrogant? I get to address this with my wife and our baby. This is my practice now."
    It is also the material he hopes to shape into a second book. "I know where it all comes from. I've done a lot of counseling in my life. And I can look and see I was this ostracized kid who had the esteem beaten out of him by bullies and unfriendly cohorts.
    "It's me trying to build my esteem up and in a lot of ways be better than everybody. Because if I'm not better than everybody, then what the kids told me in third and fifth and eighth grade — that I was worthless, that I wasn't good enough to play with them, that I wasn't good enough to hang out with them — is true. Elitism became my salvation."
    Boyle thinks the reason Ralston's story remains so gripping is because it is not about the feats — or ego — of a superman but about the epiphany of an everyman. Ralston escaped by realizing he had a human obligation to stay alive.
    "His superhuman status is not going to get him out of there. He can't move that rock. His skills have gone, have been used up," says Boyle on the phone. The director of such varied and visceral films as "Slumdog Millionaire," "Trainspotting" and "28 Days Later" will be in Denver on Nov. 6 to receive the Mayor's Career Achievement Award at the 33rd Starz Denver Film Festival.
    On Day Five of Ralston's tribulation in a Utah canyon, a young boy arrives. He's a hallucination, a promise, a guide.
    "It's only when he sees that child, that he sees he has a part to play amongst people," Boyle says.
    "Having a kid is not an achievement like climbing a 14,000-foot peak. It's actually an obligation and a duty. There's a modesty to it. And that to me was always what the story was about. It was a movement back to people."
    Sitting in Aspen, the town he had lived in for only six months when the incident happened, Ralston concurs.
    "It's one of those cliches that they teach you more than you teach them," he says of son Leo.
    "He's teaching me, ironically, about being in the outdoors. I find myself making better decisions than I probably ever have before. He's teaching me, as difficult a lesson as it is, that there is something, someone more important in my life than me."

    "Someone else's version of you":

    The release of "127 Hours" in theaters next month is likely to cement Ralston's place in American pop culture, in our national tales about the call of the wild and the rough pragmatism survival can demand. It also ensures a fresh cycle of media attention, which Ralston now seems better prepared to weather, Boyle says.
    "When I met him in 2006, I'll be honest, I didn't warm to him a lot. I thought, despite what he'd been through, he was the same guy in many ways.
    "And, I say this with the knowledge of hindsight, that the media circus, the extraordinary celebrity and opportunity it gave him, delayed his journey. It was only when he met his Jessica that he moved forward. When I met him again in 2009, he was a very different kind of guy, and I warmed to him enormously."
    Of course, few people have to reckon with such a peculiar clash of selves: the one re-created for mass consumption and the other lived day to day.
    Though there are many more of them this movie season.
    Ralston joins Boulder's Penny Chenery in "Secretariat," former CIA operative Valerie Plame Wilson in the upcoming feature "Fair Game," Betty Anne Waters — a waitress who went to law school to free her imprisoned brother — in "Conviction" and Mark Zuckerberg in the not-s0-flattering "The Social Network," in a parade of real-life people grappling with onscreen incarnations. Or as 84-year-old Chenery says, coming to terms with "someone else's version of you."
    In his memoir, Ralston writes that before he cut through the gristle of his forearm, he felt that he was "drawing power from every memory of my life, and all those possibilities for the future those memories represent."
    A half an hour before he goes onstage to introduce "127 Hours" to the Aspen audience, to the friends and community that rallied round him, Ralston arrives at the Wheeler Opera House greenroom. In a stroller is a wriggling, watchful Leo.
    This is the little boy in the canyon come to life. This is the child Ralston, full of gratitude, says "literally helped save my life."


    Read more: Epiphany of an everyman - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/movies/ci_...#ixzz137zzgVpN

  17. #56
    This movie is really starting to get a lot of hype.... there is even talk about an Oscar.... and the state of Utah is asking for permission to use the movie to pimp Utah adventure travel....

    I'm thinking this will result in numerous gumbies cramming the canyoneering routes for the next few years....

    YMMV

  18. #57
    Moderator jman's Avatar
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    YES!!! I just got two free screener passes for the movie. Tom was right, I thought it would play Nov. 5th, but it opens here on the 19th. But I just got a pass for the 17th, nice!!

    anyone else going? All of the seats are RSVP now on gofobo.com for the screeners. Just email one of the partners asking about a RSVP code. Maybe I'll see one of you guys there (the Broadway theaters).
    ●Canyoneering 'Canyon Conditions' @ www.candition.com
    ●Hiking Treks (my younger brother's website): hiking guides @ www.thetrekplanner.com
    "He who walks on the edge...will eventually fall."
    "There are two ways to die in the desert - dehydration and drowning." -overhearing a Park Ranger at Capitol Reef N.P.
    "...the first law of gear-dynamics: gear is like a gas - it will expand to fit the available space." -Wortman, Outside magazine.
    "SEND IT, BRO!!"

  19. #58
    127 Hours is now available to those that dabble in the dark art of torrents....

  20. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceaxe View Post
    127 Hours is now available to those that dabble in the dark art of torrents....
    Has Aron been able to get his hand on it?

  21. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Sombeech View Post
    Has Aron been able to get his hand on it?
    <applause></applause>

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