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Thread: Running Water

  1. #1

    Running Water

    Ok, I think this forum is a great addition. It's neat that we have some terrific photograpers here and now a place to pick their brains.

    I just can't seem to get that flowing water look that some of you capture. I'm shooting with good gear I'm just missing something with the settings.

    How long an exposure? Use a tripod, totally necessary? Use the timer?

    Thanks,
    Win
    Quoting my best friend, Bob McNally, after a bad boating trip: "Nature scares me!"

    Utah photos: www.winpics.fototime.com

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  3. #2
    Win great question, the way Dan explained to me is this:

    1. Close the Aperature (as small as possible F22 or something)
    2. Make sure you do it at no sun light, the less light the better
    3. Set it to either Ap mode and let the camera set the shutter slow enough, or set it to Shutter mode and slow down the camera to 2-3 seconds
    4. Also, the ISO helps here too, set it to 100-200 so the shutter would stay open as much as possible.
    5. Obviously use the tripod.
    6. You can use a remote control or set the camera to 2s delay, pushing the button with your finger would shake the camera.

    Is this right guys?

  4. #3
    Bogley BigShot
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    Awesome! I was going to ask the same question!

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex
    Win great question, the way Dan explained to me is this:

    1. Close the Aperature (as small as possible F22 or something)
    2. Make sure you do it at no sun light, the less light the better
    3. Set it to either Ap mode and let the camera set the shutter slow enough, or set it to Shutter mode and slow down the camera to 2-3 seconds
    4. Also, the ISO helps here too, set it to 100-200 so the shutter would stay open as much as possible.
    5. Obviously use the tripod.
    6. You can use a remote control or set the camera to 2s delay, pushing the button with your finger would shake the camera.

    Is this right guys?
    Sounds good. Another thing I would add is to shoot these always in low light -- dusk, dawn, or in an enclosed slot canyon all are ideal for this kind of thing.
    Office Spacing
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  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex
    1. Close the Aperature (as small as possible F22 or something)
    2. Make sure you do it at no sun light, the less light the better
    3. Set it to either Ap mode and let the camera set the shutter slow enough, or set it to Shutter mode and slow down the camera to 2-3 seconds
    4. Also, the ISO helps here too, set it to 100-200 so the shutter would stay open as much as possible.
    5. Obviously use the tripod.
    6. You can use a remote control or set the camera to 2s delay, pushing the button with your finger would shake the camera.
    Is this right guys?
    Pretty accurate Alex, with some modifications... Just remember, shutter speed is the key to making water silky. Between 1/2 second and 2 seconds is usually sufficient.

    1- Only close the aperture far enough to get it so your shutter speed is longer. Some water looks good at 1/2 second. Some looks good at 3 seconds. Depends on how far you are from the water, and how far it is falling. f22 can be too small in many situations.

    2- Can be done with sunlight, you just need to use either a neutral density filter or polarizer to knock the light down even darker.

    3- Doesn't matter what mode you shoot in, but Av (aperture priority) is usually the easiest.

    4 - ALWAYS shoot at ISO 100 and off a tripod for water shots.

    5 - Remote release is muy bueno in this situation, along with mirror lock up and a tripod. Remote release can be used as well if you want it.

    Here's a few examples:


    This is a 1 second exposure.


    Another 1 second exposure


    Probably 1/2 second exposure? Can't remember for sure.

    Here are a few more, same technique, different subjects.


    30 second exposure.


    30 second exposure


    Same technique, just a 45 minute exposure.

  7. #6
    Bogley BigShot
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    WOW! I love those first 2! The rest are outstanding too though.

  8. #7
    Thanks alot for the advise on this. I'll be out looking for some water in the very near future. Actually, I have a creek behind the house, I'll need to start there.

    Dan, terrific shots, especially the first two. The Star trails are something else I need to try.

    Win
    Quoting my best friend, Bob McNally, after a bad boating trip: "Nature scares me!"

    Utah photos: www.winpics.fototime.com

  9. #8
    Composition on the last 3 are amazing, well though out and shot. Ill have to dig through my best to try to match up with these.

  10. #9

  11. #10
    Dan is the man for the cotton-candy water shots.

  12. #11
    If you have some time on your hands I think this is a great video tutorial on the subject.

    http://www.radiantvista.com/archive/video_tutorials/5/

  13. #12

  14. #13
    waltny, thanks, very good examples. How long is the exposure on that one?

    We should get into a habit of posting some stats with the pics for others (me specifically ) to learn from

  15. #14
    Some shots from last winter, around Vancouver. Cheapo point and shoot (well, actually not so cheapo, cuz it's waterproof, but very point and shoot...):


    1/10 second, f3.9, ISO64, shot from the Jeep window.

    Later in the day, around dusk:


    1/4 second, f3.3, ISO400


    Pretty much dark, now:

    1/4 second, f3.3, ISO200


    1 second (plus flash), f3.3, ISO200

  16. #15
    Lots og great advices and great pictures here!

    Only one thing, in case you are concerned about image quality in a (big) print: the more you close your aperture (f/11 and beyond), the more you'll cause diffraction, and diffraction will degrade the quality of your image, i.e. the sharpness, the resolution of the finer details, will get worst and worst, and this will be noticeable as soon as you begin to print bigger (how much bigger it depends on which format you are using, obviously there are differences between DSRL, 35mm, medium format and large format)...


    Ciao!!
    Marco

  17. #16

  18. #17
    Last nite LaVerkin Cr behind my house was really flashing. I didn't use a tripod but did open to F13 and 1/3 sec. IS really helped in this case.

    Normally this is a few inches deep, running clear.

    Win

    Quoting my best friend, Bob McNally, after a bad boating trip: "Nature scares me!"

    Utah photos: www.winpics.fototime.com

  19. #18
    Amazing Pictures

  20. #19
    Carbon Footprint Donor JP's Avatar
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  21. #20
    Little Cottonwood Creek
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